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Photography

Life in 360 Degrees – Nikon KeyMission 360

2017 could very much be the year of the 360-degree camera and I’ve decided to get involved and give it a go. Especially now Facebook and YouTube support for sharing this content became available last year. Until recently creating VR video or photography required expensive rigs, multiple cameras, and stitching software. My camera of choice is going to be the Nikon KeyMission 360.

Until recently creating VR video or photography required expensive rigs, multiple cameras, and stitching software. My camera of choice is going to be the Nikon KeyMission 360.

Why the Nikon KeyMission 360

Until recently creating VR video or 360 photography required expensive rigs, multiple cameras or expensive wide angle lenses and stitching software. The GoPro Omni is one example, which purchased as a complete ready to shoot rig weighs in at £4,199.99 (at the time of writing). This price tag in my view pushes it well away from the world of hobby/personal use.

There’s a number of other cameras on the market like Samsung’s Gear 360, however, you’ll need one of their top line Galaxy phones. Of course, Samsung are also really keen that you buy their Gear VR as well to view them. I don’t have a Samsung phone, and I don’t plan on getting one anytime soon.

When the Nikon KeyMission 360 was announced last year I got really interested in the idea. One device with two wide angle cameras that cover the 360-degree field of view and stitch the images and video inside the device. So following the announcement I waited, waited and waited until it finally got released, and became available in the UK.

My D-SLR is a Nikon and whilst the KeyMission 360 doesn’t integrate into the stills photography ecosystem I felt comfortable giving their offering a try.

My first 360 photo

[vrview img=”https://www.netwalker.uk/wp-content/uploads/Uploads/DSCN0022.JPG” ]

So I’ve picked one up, and I’m going to learn how to use it, and how to get the most out of it.

I’m going to write up my initial thoughts and frustrations in my next post but for now here’s my first proper 360-degree photo straight from the device.

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Photography

My cup runneth over

‘My cup runneth over’ was a little afternoon photography project for my mother-in-law, and I’m really happy with the results. She was looking for a picture with a bible quote overlaid to sit in the kitchen, and after a little while googling wasn’t happy with anything she found, so asked if I could create a shot for her.

From the Bible, Psalms 23:5 (King James Version):

Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.

The phrase has several interpretations but he meaning we’re going for is “I have more than enough for my needs” and the image often used to illustrate the quote is an overflowing cup.

The plan for the shot was to use a a teacup and teapot, with hot tea pouring from the spout. Using our patio table, a balcony plant pot with ivy, and few purple tulips (pulling in a colour from the mother-in-law’s kitchen) and to capture the tea pouring from the spout into the cup.

We experimented with both hot tea and cold tea but found that the heat wasn’t adding anything to the picture and extended the reset time. To get a full ‘flow rate’ coming out of the teapot it needed to be at good angle and very full. Resetting between shots was straight forward, the same tea was re-used and a quick wipe up of the pot and teacup.

I’m really pleased with the outcome! Nice to work to someone else’s brief and create an image.

Cup photo setup

Cup photo setup

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Photography

Gallery: A dramatic East London sky